Utilizing TRIPS Flexibilities for Public Health Protection Through South-South Regional Frameworks
(2004; 110 pages) [Spanish] Ver el documento en el formato PDF
Índice de contenido
Ver el documentoTHE SOUTH CENTRE
Ver el documentoPREFACE
Ver el documentoABBREVIATIONS
Ver el documentoEXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoI. INTRODUCTION
Cerrar esta carpetaII. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND ACCESS TO ESSENTIAL MEDICINES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
Cerrar esta carpetaII.1. An Overview of Public Health-related TRIPS Flexibilities
Ver el documentoII.1.1 Compulsory Licensing
Ver el documentoII.1.2 Parallel Imports and Exhaustion of Rights
Ver el documentoII.1.3 Limitation on the Grant of New Use Pharmaceutical Patents
Ver el documentoII.1.4 Research and the Early Working Exceptions
Ver el documentoII.1.5 Limiting the Extent of Test Data Protection
Ver el documentoII.1.6 Control of Anti-Competitive Practices and Abuse of Intellectual Property Rights
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoIII. CONSTRAINTS ON NATIONAL EFFORTS TO IMPLEMENT TRIPS FLEXIBILITIES FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PURPOSES
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoIV. OVERCOMING CONSTRAINTS IN THE USE OF TRIPS FLEXIBILITIES THROUGH SOUTH-SOUTH REGIONAL FRAMEWORKS
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoV. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Ver el documentoBIBLIOGRAPHY
Ver el documentoBACK COVER
 

II.1. An Overview of Public Health-related TRIPS Flexibilities

The adoption of the TRIPS minimum standards resulted into a significant loss of policy flexibilities by developing countries in regulating the granting and use of pharmaceutical patents and controlling the cost of medicines. However, the Agreement left some room for countries to take public interest measures including measures to protect public health. The Doha Declaration recognized that the TRIPS Agreement does not prevent Members from taking measures to protect public health. At Doha, WTO Members also reaffirmed the right of each Member to use to the full, the provisions of the Agreement which provide flexibility for protecting public health and, in particular, for promoting access to medicines for all.

There are a number of such flexibilities which developing countries can use to address some of the negative consequences of pharmaceutical patents. The main flexibilities include: compulsory licensing; parallel importation; provisions relating to patentable subject matter; provisions relating to exceptions to patent rights; provisions relating to data protection; and provisions relating to abuse of rights, competition and the control of anti-competitive practices. The following is an overview of each of these flexibilities.10

10 For a detailed discussion of most of these public health-related TRIPS flexibilities see Correa (2000).

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