WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] Ver el documento en el formato PDF
Índice de contenido
Ver el documentoPreface
Ver el documentoIntroduction
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoParasitic infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoSuperficial fungal infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoSubcutaneous fungal infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoBacterial infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoViral infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoEczematous diseases
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoScaling diseases
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoPapulosquamous diseases
Ver el documentoCutaneous reactions to drugs
Cerrar esta carpetaPigmentary disorders
Ver el documentoVitiligo
Ver el documentoMelasma
Ver el documentoAlbinism
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoPhotodermatoses
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoBullous dermatoses
Ver el documentoAlopecia areata
Ver el documentoUrticaria
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoConditions common in children
Ver el documentoAcne vulgaris
Ver el documentoPruritus
Ver el documentoTropical ulcers
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAntimicrobial drugs
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAntifugal drugs
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAntiseptic agents
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoScabicides and pediculicides
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoMiscellaneous drugs
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex
Ver el documentoSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
Ver el documentoBack cover
 

Vitiligo

Vitiligo, which is characterized by sharply demarcated areas of depigmentation, occurs with an incidence of about 1% in most racial groups. The lesions, which develop gradually and which rarely resolve, may be solitary or multiple, in which case they are either distributed randomly (vitiligo vulgaris) or peripherally. Loss of melanin may result from an autoimmune mechanism since many of those affected also have other autoimmune disorders such as alopecia areata, Addison disease, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, diabetes or systemic sclerosis. Other cases of vitiligo can be caused by exposure to phenolic compounds.

Management

Camouflage cosmetics may help some patients to become socially integrated. Exposure to ultraviolet irradiation after oral or topical pretreatment with methoxsalen (PUVA therapy) may induce a small degree of pigmentation, but this form of treatment must be administered by specially trained dermatologists. Photoprotection is important to avoid sunburn in the depigmented areas.

Ir a la sección anterior
Ir a la siguiente sección
 
 
El Portal de Información - Medicamentos Esenciales y Productos de Salud de la OMS fue diseñado y es mantenido por la ONG Human Info. Última actualización: le 1 diciembre 2019