WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs used in Bacterial Infections
(2001; 179 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsUpper respiratory tract infections
Open this folder and view contentsLower respiratory tract infections
Open this folder and view contentsOther respiratory tract infections
Open this folder and view contentsPerioral and dental infections
Open this folder and view contentsGastrointestinal tract infections
Open this folder and view contentsUrinary tract infections
Close this folderSkin and soft tissue infections
View the documentLocalized purulent skin lesions
View the documentImpetigo
View the documentCellulitis and erysipelas
View the documentStreptococcal necrotizing fasciitis
View the documentGangrene
View the documentPyomyositis
View the documentContaminated soft tissue injuries
View the documentHuman and animal bites and clenched-fist injuries
Open this folder and view contentsBone and joint infections
Open this folder and view contentsSexually transmitted diseases
Open this folder and view contentsCardiovascular infections
Open this folder and view contentsCentral nervous system infections
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous infections
Open this folder and view contentsSepticaemia
Open this folder and view contentsDrugs (for details of contraindications, etc., see individual drug entries)
 

Cellulitis and erysipelas

Cellulitis and erysipelas are streptococcal infections of the subcutaneous tissues, which usually result from contamination of minor wounds. Both conditions are characterized by acute localized inflammation and oedema. The lesions are more superficial in erysipelas than in cellulitis and have a well defined, raised margin. Potentially fatal systemic toxaemia may supervene in patients who remain untreated. Recurrent cellulitis or erysipelas can result in chronic lymphoedema which may, in turn, serve as a predisposing factor for recurrent episodes of infection.

In infants, facial lesions similar to those of cellulitis and erysipelas may be caused by Haemophilus influenzae; however, this condition is rare in countries where H. influenzae vaccination programmes have been instituted.

Treatment

Procaine benzylpenicillin 1.5 million IU (children: 50 000IU/kg; maximum 1.5 million IU) i.m. every 24 hours for 7 - 10 days

or

benzylpenicillin 1 - 2 million IU (children: 50 000 - 100 000IU/kg; maximum 2 million IU) i.v. or i.m. every 6 hours for 7 - 10 days (once clinical improvement occurs, amoxicillin 500 mg (children: 7.5 - 15mg/kg; maximum 500mg) orally every 8 hours may be substituted)

or

cefazolin 1 - 2 g (children: 15mg/kg; maximum 2g) i.v. or i.m. every 8 hours for 7 - 10 days (once clinical improvement occurs, cefalexin 500 mg (children: 12.5 - 25mg/kg; maximum 500mg) orally every 6 hours may be substituted).

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: December 1, 2019