WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Close this folderEczematous diseases
View the documentContact dermatitis
View the documentAtopic dermatitis
View the documentSeborrhoeic dermatitis
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Seborrhoeic dermatitis

Dandruff, an erythematous, greasy, scaling eruption primarily involving the scalp, is the mildest form of seborrhoeic dermatitis. Erythema and greasy scales are found commonly in the central portion of the face (eyebrows, glabella and nasolabial folds) as well as on the chest. A more florid form, in which the lesions are extensive and the inflammatory reaction intense, is frequently seen as an early cutaneous indicator of HIV infection. Seborrhoeic dermatitis in infants appears as a non-pruritic, erythematous, scaling dermatosis involving mainly the scalp and face.

Pityrosporum yeasts are presumed to play at least a facultative, and possibly a causative role in the development of seborrhoeic dermatitis. Androgens may also be involved since men are affected more frequently than women.

Management

Use of a keratolytic shampoo reduces both the inflammation and scaling. There are many detergent-based suspensions or shampoos available containing active agents such as salicylic acid, coal tar, pyrithione zinc and selenium sulfide.

Since good foaming action is required, the shampoo should be massaged into the scalp and left for at least 2-3 minutes before rinsing.

Preparations containing combinations of sulfur and salicylic acid can also be applied to the scalp and other affected areas. Topical applications of corticosteroids, methylrosanilinium chloride (gentian violet) and/or azoles such as ketoconazole are also reported to be effective.

 

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