WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Close this folderViral infections
View the documentWarts
View the documentHerpes simplex
View the documentZoster and varicella
View the documentMolluscum contagiosum
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Zoster and varicella

In general, primary childhood infections with human (alpha) herpesvirus 3 present as varicella (chickenpox), which is characterized by the appearance of erythematous papules following a short prodromal period of malaise, fever and localized pain. Vesicles subsequently appear over several days, leaving dried crusts. Secondary infection is common. Reactivation of latent virus in children and adults results in shingles, a limited but painful infection of one or more sensory nerve roots. The thoracic dermatomes are most frequently involved.

Treatment

Intravenous therapy with aciclovir can be of value in serious infections in immunocompromised patients, but in most cases of zoster and chickenpox, all that is required is symptomatic treatment. Oral aciclovir should be reserved for elderly patients, in whom there is an increased risk of persistent postzoster neuralgia.

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