WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Close this folderViral infections
View the documentWarts
View the documentHerpes simplex
View the documentZoster and varicella
View the documentMolluscum contagiosum
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Herpes simplex

Human (alpha) herpesvirus (herpes simplex virus) 1 is carried asymptomatically by the majority of adults in almost every community. Some patients develop characteristic recurrent vesicular lesions, usually in or around the mouth and to a variable extent on the face. The lesions are small, cause only slight discomfort, and resolve within a few days without scarring. These recurrent lesions are a manifestation of reactivation in a host with an established immunity to the virus. In contrast, extensive painful gingivostomatitis or pharyngitis can occur as a primary response to exposure to the virus. Fortunately, in immunocompetent patients, this type of response is rare. However, patients with atopic eczema, newborn infants and immunocompromised patients sometimes develop a widespread vesicular eruption that can be life-threatening.

Human (alpha) herpesvirus (herpes simplex virus) 2 lesions are typically found in the genital area.1

1 For further information, see WHO model prescribing information: drugs used in sexually transmitted diseases and HIV infection. Geneva, World Health Organization, 1995.

Treatment

Mild infections with herpesvirus 1 are self-limiting and usually require no treatment. Newborn infants, immunocompromised patients and patients with atopic eczema should be treated with systemic aciclovir.

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