WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Close this folderSuperficial fungal infections
View the documentDermatophyte infections
View the documentPityriasis (tinea) versicolor
View the documentCandidosis
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Pityriasis (tinea) versicolor

Pityriasis (tinea) versicolor, which occurs in hot, humid tropical regions and appears with greatest frequency in young adults, is caused by a normally commensal yeast, Malassezia furfur. Slowly spreading white or yellow-brown scaly plaques interspersed with depigmented areas appear on the trunk, buttocks and limbs, and rarely on the face. The active lesions appear dark in light-skinned persons, but in those with darker skins they may be pale and, if left untreated, they may leave hypopigmented patches.

Treatment

Application of sodium thiosulfate, 25% lotion, twice daily for 4 weeks should be started promptly. This is usually helpful, although areas of depigmentation remain long after completion of successful treatment. However, relapses are common, probably because much of the infected area may appear normal and be left untreated. Better results have been reported with topical applications of selenium sulfide. A thin layer of undiluted 2.5% detergent-based suspension should be applied at bedtime to the trunk, groin, upper limbs and axillae, and rinsed off after 5-15 minutes. Treatment should be repeated after 3 and 6 days. An alternative to selenium sulfide is salicylic acid. Initially a thin layer of the 2% ointment or paste is applied daily. The concentration is progressively increased to a maximum of 6%, and applications are continued until a satisfactory remission is obtained. Ketoconazole, 2% cream, applied once or twice daily for several weeks, is also usually effective. A single oral dose of 400 mg or a dose of 200 mg daily for 5 consecutive days is also reported to be effective.

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