WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Close this folderInsect and arachnid bites and stings
View the documentMosquitos and other biting flies
View the documentBees, wasps, hornets and ants
View the documentBedbugs and reduviid bugs
View the documentScorpions
View the documentPoisonous spiders
View the documentChiggers or harvest mites
View the documentTicks
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Ticks

Ticks are more important as vectors of systemic infections than as inducers of skin disease. They act as reservoir hosts for the rickettsiae that cause typhus, Q-fever and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, for the arboviruses that cause haemorrhagic fever, and for the spirochaetes that cause borreliosis, including relapsing fevers and Lyme disease. When left undisturbed, they may adhere to the skin by their mouth parts for long enough to induce dermal nodules.

Prevention and management

Insect repellents such as diethyltoluamide are effective. In addition, protective clothing such as long-sleeved shirts and long trousers should be worn. Exposed skin should be examined every evening when there is a risk of exposure. The tick may be extracted by grasping the head with tweezers or fine forceps and gradually pulling it straight from the point of attachment.

 

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