WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Close this folderInsect and arachnid bites and stings
View the documentMosquitos and other biting flies
View the documentBees, wasps, hornets and ants
View the documentBedbugs and reduviid bugs
View the documentScorpions
View the documentPoisonous spiders
View the documentChiggers or harvest mites
View the documentTicks
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Poisonous spiders

Poisonous spiders are endemic in the tropics and the southern hemisphere where they typically inhabit woodpiles, outhouses and dark corners of garages and houses. Localized pain, swelling and erythema occur within 30 minutes of the bite. Abdominal cramps, which may simulate an acute condition requiring immediate surgery, are an indication of dissemination of the venom. In severe cases, intense localized pain and vasoconstriction can be followed by oedema and local necrosis. Complications, which are often fatal, include acute haemolysis, pulmonary oedema and renal insufficiency.

Prevention and management

Indoor spraying with pyrethroids is highly effective as a control measure. After being bitten, the patient should remain as still as possible, since movement accelerates dissemination of the venom. Specific antivenoms are of value when the species of spider is known. Otherwise, analgesics and muscle relaxants should be given to relieve pain and muscular spasms. Oral corticosteroids, if administered within 24 hours of the attack, are claimed to reduce the risk of local necrosis and the incidence of disfiguring scars.

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