WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Close this folderInsect and arachnid bites and stings
View the documentMosquitos and other biting flies
View the documentBees, wasps, hornets and ants
View the documentBedbugs and reduviid bugs
View the documentScorpions
View the documentPoisonous spiders
View the documentChiggers or harvest mites
View the documentTicks
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Scorpions

Scorpions are endemic in the Americas, North Africa, Turkey and some parts of India. Their sting causes an immediate intense localized aching pain coupled with a burning sensation. Children are most commonly attacked and most seriously affected. Absorption of significant amounts of toxin results in vomiting and profuse sweating. Untreated, patients may experience an acute hypertensive crisis during which they are at risk of cardiac dysrhythmias, pulmonary oedema, or even death. In Trinidad, scorpion stings are the main cause of pancreatitis.

Prevention and management

Simple analgesics, including aspirin and paracetamol, help to relieve pain. However, because of the potential for severe reactions, every effort should be made to get the patient to a hospital as soon as possible. Vasodilators, administered in a hospital setting within 24 hours of the attack, may attenuate the cardiovascular response and possibly reduce mortality. In endemic areas, species-specific antiscorpion sera may be available locally and can be of value if administered within a few hours.

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