WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Close this folderMiscellaneous drugs
View the documentDapsone
View the documentFluorouracil
View the documentMethoxsalen
View the documentPodophyllum resin
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Podophyllum resin

Solution, 10-25%

General information

Podophyllum resin is a powdered mixture of resins extracted from the roots of Podophyllum pelltatum. A solution is prepared by forming a paste with benzoin in alcohol. It is a caustic keratolytic agent for topical application.

Clinical information

Uses

Topical treatment of genital warts (condylomata acuminata).

Dosage and administration

Adults and children: a 10-25% solution should be applied to the affected area. Care must be taken to avoid contact with normal tissue. Zinc oxide paste may be used to protect the surrounding skin. The residue on the skin should be thoroughly rinsed off after 1-4 hours.

Treatment may be repeated at weekly intervals up to a maximum of four applications.

The active ingredient podophyllotoxin (0.5%) is available in some countries. It is less corrosive and can be applied without medical supervision.

Contraindications

Podophyllum resin should not be applied to large areas of skin, nor should it be used in the treatment of cervical, urethral, anorectal or oral warts.

Treatment is contraindicated during pregnancy since podophyllum resin is both teratogenic and fetotoxic.

Precautions

Preparations of podophyllum resin should be used only under close medical supervision because potentially serious local and systemic toxic effects can result from prolonged or excessive applications. Systemic absorption is enhanced when applications are made to friable, bleeding warts.

Adverse effects

The systemic effects of excessive cutaneous absorption include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhoea.

Transient leukopenia and thrombocytopenia sometimes occur, providing evidence of bone-marrow depression.

Gross over-application can result in serious neurotoxicity. The signs are characteristically delayed in onset and slow to resolve. They include visual and auditory hallucinations, delusions, disorientation, confusion and delirium.

Storage

Topical solution should be kept in tightly closed containers, protected from light and excessive heat. The shelf-life of the resin is highly variable and some formulations may begin to degrade within a few days of exposure to light, air or heat.

 

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: December 1, 2019