WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Close this folderMiscellaneous drugs
View the documentDapsone
View the documentFluorouracil
View the documentMethoxsalen
View the documentPodophyllum resin
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Fluorouracil

Ointment, 5%

General information

Fluorouracil is a fluorinated pyrimidine antagonist which acts by interfering with DNA synthesis. Systemic absorption following topical application appears to be insignificant.

Clinical information

Uses

Treatment of:

• actinic keratosis
• genital warts that fail to respond to treatment with either podophyllum resin or podophyllotoxin.

Dosage and administration

Adults and children: a thin layer of ointment should be applied to the affected area once or twice daily. Treatment should be continued until there is a marked inflammatory response. The usual duration of treatment is 3-4 weeks, but the degree of reaction may be such that therapy can be shortened. Complete healing may not occur until 2 months after cessation of therapy. The rate of healing can be improved by the use of a topical corticosteroid such as hydrocortisone, 1% cream.

Contraindications

Known hypersensitivity to fluorouracil.

Precautions

If the affected area does not respond to fluorouracil therapy, a biopsy should be taken to confirm the diagnosis and rule out the possibility that there is a basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma.

Care should be taken to avoid contact with the mucous membranes and eyes.

Since exposure to ultraviolet light intensifies the inflammatory reaction, prolonged exposure to sunlight should be avoided during treatment.

Adverse reactions

Local inflammatory reactions including swelling, scaling, a burning sensation, pain and hyperpigmentation are part of the therapeutic response.

Storage

Ointment should be stored in well-closed containers below 30 °C.

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