WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Close this folderParasitic infections
View the documentPediculosis
View the documentScabies
View the documentCutaneous larva migrans (creeping eruption)
View the documentGnathostomiasis
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Cutaneous larva migrans (creeping eruption)

Cutaneous larva migrans results when the larvae of the hookworms Ancylostoma braziliense and A. caninum, which are excreted by infected dogs and cats, penetrate intact skin. Other nematode species have also been implicated. The condition is particularly prevalent in Central America, some countries of South America, the Caribbean and the southeastern United States, and throughout tropical Africa. It is characterized by pruritic, winding, thread-like inflammatory lesions, most commonly on the feet.

In most cases, the larvae remain localized, causing only a transient focal dermatitis of varying intensity. They do not mature into adult worms in humans but, occasionally, they migrate to the lungs to cause eosinophilia, cough and pulmonary infiltrates (Loeffler syndrome).

Control

Prevention is directed to interrupting transmission. Regular deworming of dogs and cats reduces contamination of soil and protective footwear reduces the likelihood of contact.

Treatment

Albendazole administered orally in a single dose of 400 mg cures almost all cases.1 Tiabendazole may also be of value when administered topically twice or three times daily for 7-10 days. Calamine lotion provides symptomatic relief.

1 For further information, see WHO model prescribing information: drugs used in parasitic diseases, 2nd ed. Geneva, World Health Organization, 1995.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: December 1, 2019