WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Close this folderAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
View the documentChlorphenamine
View the documentAlternative antihistamines
View the documentEpinephrine
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Alternative antihistamines

Many other antihistamines are currently in use in dermatological care. These include: diphenhydramine (25-mg and 50-mg tablet, as hydrochloride), which is given at a dosage of 25-100 mg four times daily to adults and 12.5-25 mg four times daily to children aged 2-12 years; cyproheptadine (4-mg tablet, as hydrochloride), which is administered at a dosage of 4 mg three or four times daily to adults and 2 mg three or four times daily to children; and hydroxyzine (10-mg and 25-mg tablet, as hydrochloride), which is given at a dosage of 10-50 mg four times daily to adults and 15-25 mg four times daily to children.

In addition, two non-sedating antihistamines have enjoyed popularity recently. Astemizole is long-acting and is given at a dosage of 10 mg (one tablet) once daily to adults and 5 mg or less once daily to children. It is reported to be of particular use in chronic urticaria. Terfenadine is given at a dosage of 60 mg (one tablet) twice daily to adults and 30 mg or less twice daily to children. The prescribed dosage of these drugs should not be exceeded and they should not be administered to patients receiving ketoconazole, itraconazole, or macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin since prolongation of the Q-T interval and ventricular arrhythmias including torsades de pointe have been reported.

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