WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Close this folderScabicides and pediculicides
View the documentBenzyl benzoate
View the documentLindane
View the documentPermethrin
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Lindane

Cream, lotion or powder, 0.3%

General information

Lindane is a cyclic chlorinated hydrocarbon that is toxic to Sarcoptes scabiei, Pediculus humanus capitis, P. humanus corporis and Pthirus pubis. However, resistance to lindane has been reported in certain strains of P. humanus capitis in some countries.

Lindane is slowly and incompletely absorbed following topical application. Absorption is enhanced when it is applied to the face, scalp, neck, axillae, scrotum or damaged or occluded skin. It is metabolized in the liver and slowly excreted in the urine.

Clinical information

Uses

Treatment of scabies and pediculosis of the scalp, body and pubic region.

Dosage and administration

All doses are suitable for adults and children over 10 years.

Scabies:

The lotion should be applied to all skin surfaces, excluding the head. It should be rinsed off after 24 hours.

Pediculus humanus capitis:

The lotion should be massaged into the scalp and hair and left for at least 12 hours before rinsing.

Household contacts should be treated at the same time. All combs and brushes should be soaked in a pediculicidal solution (see Parasitic infections - Prevention and management) for at least 2 hours.

Pediculus humanus corporis:

The body should be dusted with the powder. Clothes should be treated at the same time and subsequently washed in boiling water. If this is impractical, they should be left outside exposed to the air for 72 hours.

Pthirus pubis:

The lotion should be applied to the hair and skin of the pubic area and left for at least 12 hours before rinsing. If necessary, the thighs, axillae, trunk and head (including the eyebrows) should also be treated. Sexual partners should be treated simultaneously.

No more than 30 g of the lotion should be applied on any one occasion.

Contraindications

• Known hypersensitivity.
• Age under 10 years.
• Pregnancy.

Precautions

Seizures have been reported with concentrations higher than 0.3%.

Care should be taken to avoid contact with the face, eyes and mucous membranes.

Use in pregnancy

Lindane has been shown to cause fetal toxicity in animal studies. It should not be used during pregnancy.

Adverse effects

Local irritation can occur. Repeated applications may cause contact dermatitis. Prolonged extensive application of lindane can cause restlessness, muscle spasms, convulsions and ultimately coma. Death may occur from subsequent respiratory failure.

Overdosage

Gastric lavage is of value when undertaken within a few hours of accidental ingestion or systemic absorption. Convulsions should be treated with intravenous diazepam. Treatment is otherwise supportive.

Storage

Preparations should be stored in well-closed containers.

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