WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Close this folderKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
View the documentBenzoyl peroxide
View the documentCoal tar
View the documentDithranol
View the documentSalicylic acid
View the documentTretinoin
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Dithranol

Ointment, 0.1-2.0%

General information

Dithranol slows epidermal cell division and inhibits excessive proliferation and keratinization of epidermal cells in patients with psoriasis.

Dithranol is not significantly absorbed following topical application.

Clinical information

Uses

Treatment of localized psoriasis vulgaris.

Dosage and administration

Dithranol should be used only under the direction of a physician trained in its use.

Adults and children: treatment should be started with the 0.1% ointment. After 7 days, the concentration may be increased to 0.25% and subsequently doubled, if necessary, at weekly intervals to a maximum strength of 2%.

A thin layer of ointment should be applied once daily to the affected areas for 2-4 weeks. After application, the ointment should be left in place for 10-20 minutes before rinsing thoroughly.

Contraindications

Dithranol should not be used on the face or on acute eruptions or excessively inflamed areas.

Precautions

Care should be taken to avoid contact with normal tissue and the eyes.

If the initial treatment produces excessive soreness, or if the lesions spread, the frequency of application should be reduced. In extreme cases, treatment should be discontinued.

Patients may be more sensitive in treated sites to sun exposure.

Patients should be warned that staining of the skin and hair may occur and that clothing may be permanently stained.

Use in pregnancy

Safe use in pregnancy has not been established, but no adverse effects have been reported.

Adverse effects

Contact with the eyes may cause severe conjunctivitis.

Skin irritation is common. Photosensitivity reactions may occur. Severe erythema may also occur on adjacent normal skin.

Storage

Ointment should be stored in tightly closed containers, protected from light.

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