WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Close this folderAntifugal drugs
View the documentAmphotericin B
View the documentBenzoic acid + salicylic acid (Whitfield’s ointment)
View the documentClotrimazole
View the documentEconazole
View the documentFluconazole
View the documentFlucytosine
View the documentGriseofulvin
View the documentItraconazole
View the documentKetoconazole
View the documentMiconazole
View the documentNystatin
View the documentPotassium iodide
View the documentSelenium sulfide
View the documentSodium thiosulfate
View the documentTerbinafine
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Clotrimazole

Cream, 1%
Pessary, 500 mg

General information

Clotrimazole is a synthetic imidazole active against fungi (both dermatophytes and yeasts) and Gram-positive cocci (Staphylococcus and Streptococcus spp.) which can be used as an alternative to miconazole.

Clinical information

Uses

• Treatment of superficial fungal infections of the skin caused by both dermatophytes and yeasts and of secondary infections caused by Gram-positive cocci. Specific indications include ringworm, intertrigo, diaper dermatitis and chronic paronychia due to Candida spp., fungal infections of the outer ear and pityriasis (tinea) versicolor.

• Treatment of vaginal candidosis.

Dosage and administration

Superficial fungal infections of the skin and secondary infections:

Adults and children: a thin layer of cream should be applied to all affected areas twice or 3 times daily. Treatment should be continued for 14 days after lesions have healed. In tinea pedis, treatment should be continued for at least 4 weeks.

Vaginal candidosis:

A single dose of 50 mg of cream or a pessary should be inserted high into the vagina. If relapse occurs, the dosage should be increased to 100 mg of cream daily for 12 days.

Contraindications

• Known hypersensitivity to azole derivatives.
• Severe liver impairment.

Precautions

Treatment should be discontinued if irritation or sensitivity occurs. Clotrimazole should not come in contact with the eyes.

Use in pregnancy and lactation

Topically applied clotrimazole is not systemically absorbed and can be used safely during pregnancy and lactation.

Adverse effects

Isolated cases of sensitization have been reported, characterized by irritation and a burning sensation and necessitating discontinuation of treatment.

Storage

Clotrimazole cream should be stored in a cool place, protected from light. Pessaries should be stored below 15°C in well-closed containers, protected from light.

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