WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Close this folderAntifugal drugs
View the documentAmphotericin B
View the documentBenzoic acid + salicylic acid (Whitfield’s ointment)
View the documentClotrimazole
View the documentEconazole
View the documentFluconazole
View the documentFlucytosine
View the documentGriseofulvin
View the documentItraconazole
View the documentKetoconazole
View the documentMiconazole
View the documentNystatin
View the documentPotassium iodide
View the documentSelenium sulfide
View the documentSodium thiosulfate
View the documentTerbinafine
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Potassium iodide

Saturated solution, 1 g/ml

General information

Potassium iodide aqueous oral solution is a clear liquid with a characteristic, strong salty taste.

Clinical information

Uses

Treatment of sporotrichosis and subcutaneous zygomycosis.

Dosage and administration

Potassium iodide should preferably be administered in a glass of fruit juice, milk or water, or taken with food.

Adults and children: initially five drops three times daily, increasing by one drop per dose up to a maximum of 30-40 drops three times daily (depending on tolerance). Treatment should be continued for at least one month after clinical resolution of lesions.

Should signs of iodism occur, treatment should be temporarily suspended and restarted several days later at a lower dose.

Contraindications

• Known hypersensitivity to iodides.
• Acute bronchitis or active tuberculosis.
• Pregnancy.

Precautions

Dose-related goitre or hypothyroidism can occur, but rapidly resolves on withdrawal of the drug.

Use in pregnancy

Potassium iodide is contraindicated during pregnancy since it may cause fetal hypothyroidism.

Adverse effects

Prolonged administration may result in iodism, characterized by nausea, vomiting, an acneiform rash, metallic taste, increased salivation, coryza and irritation and swelling of the eyes. Severe headache, productive cough and pulmonary oedema can also occur. Other adverse effects include gastrointestinal disturbances and diarrhoea.

Overdosage

Copious amounts of milk and starch should be ingested. If there is no evidence of oesophageal irritation or ulceration, gastric lavage is of value. Fluid and electrolyte balance should be maintained.

Storage

Preparations should be stored in well-closed containers, protected from light.

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