WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Close this folderConditions common in children
View the documentDiaper dermatitis
View the documentHaemangiomas
View the documentMiliaria
View the documentPityriasis alba (patchy hypochromia)
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Diaper dermatitis

Diaper dermatitis is among the three most common skin diseases in small infants all over the world. Changing habits in rural as well as urban communities have increased the frequency of this condition. It is induced by the occlusion of the area covered by diapers due to the use of impermeable disposable diapers or rubber pants. Disposable diapers are convenient though expensive, and therefore not changed with the required frequency. In working households, the problem is often aggravated by the fact that infants are left in the care of either their slightly older siblings or their grandparents, who may not receive adequate instructions on how to deal with the diaper area.

Management

Diaper dermatitis can be prevented by cleaning the anogenital area with water as soon as the infant urinates or defecates. Soap may be an irritant if used often on sensitive skin. Leaving the area uncovered is also useful but may not be practical. Diaper dermatitis is often triggered by an episode of watery diarrhoea, which is usually acidic and more irritating to the skin. Application of a thick, drying cream, such as zinc oxide paste (petroleum jelly 50%, zinc oxide 50%) may prevent skin irritation due to diarrhoea. However, once diaper dermatitis is present, treatment should be addressed to the factors implicated, including humidity, maceration, and secondary infections with bacteria and fungi. Clioquinol, 1-2% powder, can be added to zinc oxide paste to help control secondary bacterial infections. Topical corticosteroids are best avoided in this area.

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