WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Close this folderConditions common in children
View the documentDiaper dermatitis
View the documentHaemangiomas
View the documentMiliaria
View the documentPityriasis alba (patchy hypochromia)
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Pityriasis alba (patchy hypochromia)

Pityriasis alba (patchy hypochromia) affects over 80% of children living in rural areas of developing countries. The disease is characterized by oval or round, scaly, hypochromic lesions in light-exposed areas. Its etiology is obscure. In developed countries, pityriasis alba, which generally is seen with slight scaling, is often a manifestation of atopy (inflammation causes residual hypopigmentation, which is aggravated by the use of topical corticosteroids). In developing countries, skin dryness, nasal discharge and poor hygiene may favour subclinical bacterial proliferation and parakeratosis. These in turn are clinically manifested as fine desquamation and hypochromia.

Management

While hypochromia is only a minor cosmetic problem, it is often perceived as a health priority. Management should be addressed first to explaining the nature of the disease and its lack of relation to other common conditions in developing countries such as vitamin deficiencies, intestinal parasite infections or other infections. It is also necessary to point out that the disease itself is not contagious. Emollients can be prescribed. In developing countries, a topical preparation consisting of 60% petroleum jelly and 40% zinc oxide with 2% clioquinol powder and 0.5% coal tar is used for this condition. The preparation should be applied at night and washed off in the morning. Treatment usually has to be maintained for 4-6 weeks.

 

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