WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Close this folderConditions common in children
View the documentDiaper dermatitis
View the documentHaemangiomas
View the documentMiliaria
View the documentPityriasis alba (patchy hypochromia)
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Haemangiomas

Haemangiomas are benign tumours of the blood vessels. They are among the most frequent causes of consultation in children all over the world. Haemangiomas may result from vascular malformations or vascular proliferation. The most common vascular malformative haemangiomas are the mediofrontal and occipital haemangiomas of infants (stork bites) that spontaneously regress during childhood and the so-called port-wine stain, while the most frequent vascular proliferative haemangioma is the immature capillary haemangioma or strawberry haemangioma. Strawberry haemangiomas usually appear shortly after birth, grow rapidly for several months, sometimes ulcerate without bleeding, and spontaneously regress. Most strawberry haemangiomas only reach a few centimetres in diameter, but occasionally they may involve large areas of the skin. On the face, they may compromise sight, smell or taste.

Management

Small haemangiomas should only be observed. If ulceration occurs, a mild antiseptic solution such as methylrosanilinium chloride (gentian violet; see Methylrosanilinium chloride) should be applied topically to prevent secondary infection. Patients with rapidly growing or large haemangiomas should be referred to a secondary- or tertiary-level health centre for evaluation and treatment.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: December 1, 2019