WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Close this folderBullous dermatoses
View the documentPemphigus
View the documentBullous pemphigoid
View the documentDermatitis herpetiformis
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Dermatitis herpetiformis

Dermatitis herpetiformis is a chronic disease that typically first appears in early adulthood. It is characterized by intense pruritus with alternate phases of activity and remission. Pruritic papules and vesicles develop preferentially and symmetrically on the buttocks and the extensor surfaces of the knees and elbows. Patients with dermatitis herpetiformis often have an associated gluten-sensitive enteropathy which may be asymptomatic. Iodine or iodides may be an enhancer or trigger for the disease.

Treatment

Patients usually require lifelong treatment; spontaneous remissions occur in about 10% of patients. A few patients respond adequately to a gluten-free diet alone, but most need indefinite treatment with dapsone. An initial dose of 100 mg daily usually suppresses the formation of new lesions within 24-48 hours and dramatically reduces pruritus. The dose may need to be increased to 200 mg daily. Administration of dapsone is associated with methaemoglobinaemia and haemolytic anaemia, particularly in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. The dosage should then be reduced to the lowest dosage that will suppress symptoms.

 

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