WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Close this folderPhotodermatoses
View the documentSolar urticaria
View the documentPolymorphous light eruptions
View the documentActinic prurigo
View the documentChemical photodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Actinic prurigo

Actinic prurigo, which occurs particularly among people of American Indian and Asian descent, first appears during childhood. It usually regresses completely during adolescence and early adulthood but can persist longer. Recurrent patchy oedematous erythema results in the formation of persistent excoriated plaques, papules and nodules. Cheilitis is common, particularly during the early phases of the disease. Vesicles and small pitted scars sometimes develop on the face, while chronic conjunctivitis and pterygium formation are common among affected children in South America, New Mexico and Saskatchewan, Canada.

Treatment

Sunscreens, when used regularly, provide some protection. The cutaneous signs are suppressed by thalidomide and, to a lesser extent, topical corticosteroids, but they recur within a few weeks of discontinuation of treatment. Thalidomide should be avoided in women of child-bearing age, since it is a proven teratogen. If this is not possible, it is imperative that pregnancy be excluded before this treatment is instituted. Effective contraception must be used during the 4 weeks preceding and following treatment, as well as during the treatment period. Should pregnancy occur despite these precautions, there is a high risk of severe malformation of the fetus.

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