WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Close this folderPigmentary disorders
View the documentVitiligo
View the documentMelasma
View the documentAlbinism
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Melasma

Melasma, which is characterized by the gradual development of symmetrical light-brown macules distributed in butterfly fashion on the nose, cheeks and forehead, typically occurs in dark-skinned people. It often appears during pregnancy in women living in dry, sunny climates, but is most frequently seen in those taking oral contraceptives. Melasma of pregnancy usually resolves a few months after delivery but, otherwise, spontaneous remission is rare.

Management

Women who are not pregnant should be advised of the possible implications of oral contraceptive use. Sunscreens containing either p-aminobenzoic acid or benzophenones may attenuate the condition, provided that they have a sun protection factor (SPF) rating of at least 15. Topical preparations containing calamine, zinc oxide, titanium dioxide or other constituents which reflect incident light (physical sunblocks) can also provide useful protection when they are applied carefully.

Bleaching creams containing hydroquinone have been used with some success; however, they may produce persistent mottled hypopigmentation.

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