WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Close this folderPigmentary disorders
View the documentVitiligo
View the documentMelasma
View the documentAlbinism
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Vitiligo

Vitiligo, which is characterized by sharply demarcated areas of depigmentation, occurs with an incidence of about 1% in most racial groups. The lesions, which develop gradually and which rarely resolve, may be solitary or multiple, in which case they are either distributed randomly (vitiligo vulgaris) or peripherally. Loss of melanin may result from an autoimmune mechanism since many of those affected also have other autoimmune disorders such as alopecia areata, Addison disease, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, diabetes or systemic sclerosis. Other cases of vitiligo can be caused by exposure to phenolic compounds.

Management

Camouflage cosmetics may help some patients to become socially integrated. Exposure to ultraviolet irradiation after oral or topical pretreatment with methoxsalen (PUVA therapy) may induce a small degree of pigmentation, but this form of treatment must be administered by specially trained dermatologists. Photoprotection is important to avoid sunburn in the depigmented areas.

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