WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Close this folderPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentLichen planus
View the documentPityriasis rosea
View the documentPsoriasis
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Pityriasis rosea

Pityriasis rosea is a common self-limiting dermatosis that is probably of viral origin. It is characterized by the appearance of an annular, erythematous scaly lesion (herald patch) on the trunk, neck or upper limb. On rare occasions, this lesion may be preceded by a prodromal episode of malaise, headache and sore throat. Within a few days, a symmetrical rash often indistinguishable from that of secondary syphilis (but mildly pruritic) becomes apparent, usually on the back. The rash usually persists for 6 weeks, although it may last for as long as 12 weeks. In dark-skinned persons post-inflammatory hyperpigmentary changes may be permanent.

Management

Specific treatment is neither available nor necessary. If the diagnosis is in doubt, a serological test to exclude the possibility of syphilis should be undertaken. Topical application of calamine lotion or 1% hydrocortisone acetate may help to relieve pruritus. Exposure to the sun or ultraviolet light may also be beneficial.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: December 1, 2019