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dc.contributor.authorWHO Expert Committee on Health of the Elderlyen
dc.contributor.authorWorld Health Organizationen
dc.coverage.spatialGeneva
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-16T14:05:41Z
dc.date.available2012-06-16T14:05:41Z
dc.date.created1989en
dc.date.issued1989en
dc.identifier.isbn9241207795
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.who.int/iris/handle/10665/39521
dc.descriptionita In Quaderni di Sanità Pubblica. - Anno 14, no. 70 (‎aprile 1991)‎en
dc.descriptionjap published by: Tokyo : Japan Public Health Associationen
dc.descriptionvie published by: Paris : Fondation Danielle Mitteranden
dc.description98 p.en
dc.description.abstractAn expert review of recent advances in knowledge about the biology of human aging, the special health needs of the elderly, and the present and future demands on health services. Representing the consensus reached by an international group of experts, the report concentrates on the many changes in skills, training, attitudes, policies, and services that will be needed to cope with the growing proportion of the elderly in the world population. Throughout, recommended changes are guided by the need to identify the specific interventions and policies most likely to increase the number of elderly who can achieve, in an undisabled state, their genetic potential for longevity. The report opens with an extensive analysis of research findings and conceptual models that shed light on the aging process and provide a background for identifying appropriate interventions and services. Specific topics discussed include the differences between intrinsic and extrinsic aging, the characteristic properties of illness in the elderly, the consequences of demographic aging in both industrialized and developing countries, and trends in the main causes of mortality and morbidity in selected groups of countries. Against this background, the report turns to a point-by-point review of progress in alleviating the main causes of morbidity and suffering among the elderly, including advances in understanding and managing falls, osteoporosis, visual and hearing impairments, changes in mental capacity, incontinence, stroke, and iatrogenic disorders. The next chapter, devoted to issues of health care, attempts to dispel some of the confusion surrounding the types of care, whether primary, family, or institutional, most appropriate to the needs of the elderly, social systems of support, and available resources. Other chapters provide estimates of future needs for personnel and training and consider the relationship between improving pension income and providing services. The report concludes with brief descriptions of health care policies for the elderly in Thailand and recent efforts to restructure services in the USSRen
dc.language.isoiten
dc.language.isozhen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.language.isojaen
dc.language.isovien
dc.language.isofren
dc.language.isoruen
dc.language.isoesen
dc.publisherWorld Health Organization
dc.publisherWorld Health Organization
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorld Health Organization technical report series ; no. 779en
dc.subject.meshHealth services for the ageden
dc.subject.meshGeriatricsen
dc.subject.otherHealth of the Elderlyen
dc.titleHealth of the elderly : report of a WHO Expert Committee [‎meeting held in Geneva from 3 to 9 November 1987]‎en
dc.title.alternativeLa santé des personnes âgées : rapport d' un Comité d' experts de l' OMS [‎réuni à Genève, 3-9 novembre 1987]‎en
dc.title.alternativeLa salud de las personas de edad : informe de un comité de expertos de la OMS [‎se reunió en Ginebra del 3 al 9 de noviembre de 1987]‎en
who.relation.languageVersion10665/90016
who.relation.languageVersion10665/39539en
who.relation.languageVersion10665/40593en


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