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dc.contributor.authorMurauskiene, L; Janoniene, R; Veniute, M van Ginneken, E and Karanikolos Men_US
dc.contributor.authorEuropean Observatory on Health Systems and Policiesen_US
dc.coverage.spatialCopenhagenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-23T14:49:03Z
dc.date.available2019-12-23T14:49:03Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1817-6127
dc.identifier.urihttps://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/330306
dc.description150 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis analysis of the Lithuanian health system reviews the developments in organization and governance, health financing, health-care provision, health reforms and health system performance since 2000. The Lithuanian health system is a mixed system, predominantly funded from the National Health Insurance Fund through a compulsory health insurance scheme, supplemented by substantial state contributions on behalf of the economically inactive population amounting to about half of its budget. Public financing of the health sector has gradually increased since 2004 to 5.2% of GDP in 2010. Although the Lithuanian health system was tested by the recent economic crisis, Lithuania’s counter-cyclical state health insurance contribution policies (‎ensuring coverage for the economically inactive population)‎ helped the health system to weather the crisis, and Lithuania successfully used the crisis as a lever to reduce the prices of medicines. Yet the future impact of cuts in public health spending is a cause for concern. In addition, out-of-pocket payments remain high (‎in particular for pharmaceuticals)‎ and could threaten health access for vulnerable groups. A number of challenges remain. The primary care system needs strengthening so that more patients are treated instead of being referred to a specialist, which will also require a change in attitude by patients. Transparency and accountability need to be increased in resource allocation, including financing of capital investment and in the payer–provider relationship. Finally, population health, albeit improving, remains a concern, and major progress can be achieved by reducing the burden of amenable and preventable mortality.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWorld Health Organization. Regional Office for Europeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesHealth Systems in Transition;vol. 15, n. 2
dc.subject.meshDelivery of Health Careen_US
dc.subject.meshEvaluation Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHealthcare Financingen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Reformen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Systems Plansen_US
dc.subject.meshLithuaniaen_US
dc.titleLithuania: health system reviewen_US
dc.typePublicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshqualifierorganization and administrationen_US


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