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dc.contributor.authorHasitha Tisseraen_US
dc.contributor.authorNimalka Pannila-Hettien_US
dc.contributor.authorPreshila Samaraweeraen_US
dc.contributor.authorJayantha Weeramanen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaba Palihawadanaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnanda Amarasingheen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-05T06:15:19Z
dc.date.available2019-11-05T06:15:19Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.issn2224-3151 (‎‎‎‎Print)‎‎‎‎
dc.identifier.issn2304-5272 (‎‎‎‎Electronic)‎‎‎‎
dc.identifier.urihttps://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/329657
dc.description.abstractDengue is a leading public health problem in Sri Lanka. All 26 districts and all age groups are affected, with high disease transmission; the estimated average annual incidence is 175/100 000 population. Harnessing the World Health Organization Global strategy for dengue prevention and control, 2012–2020, Sri Lanka has pledged in its National Strategic Framework to achieve a mortality from dengue below 0.1% and to reduce morbidity by 50% (‎from the average of the last 5 years)‎ by 2020. Turning points in the country’s dengue-control programme have been the restructuring and restrategizing of the core functions; this has involved establishment of a separate dengue-control unit to coordinate integrated vector management, and creation of a presidential task force. There has been great progress in disease surveillance, clinical management and vector control. Enhanced real-time surveillance for early warning allows ample preparedness for an outbreak. National guidelines with enhanced diagnostics have significantly improved clinical management of dengue, reducing the case-fatality rate to 0.2%. Proactive integrated vector management, with multisector partnership, has created a positive vector-control environment; however, sustaining this momentum is a challenge. Robust surveillance, evidence-based clinical management, sustainable vector control and effective communication are key strategies that will be implemented to achieve set targets. Improved early detection and a standardized treatment protocol with enhanced diagnostics at all medical care institutions will lead to further reduction in mortality. Making the maximum effort to minimize outbreaks through sustainable vector control in the three dimensions of risk mapping, innovation and risk modification will enable a reduction in morbidityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWorld Health Organization. Regional Office for South-East Asiaen_US
dc.subjectdengueen_US
dc.subjectdengue epidemicen_US
dc.subjectdengue prevention and control strategiesen_US
dc.subjectsustainable integrated dengue controlen_US
dc.subjectSri Lankaen_US
dc.titleSustainable dengue prevention and control through a comprehensive integrated approach: the Sri Lankan perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal / periodical articlesen_US
dc.description.startpage106en_US
dc.description.endpage112en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWHO South-East Asia Journal of Public Healthen_US
dc.relation.issue2en_US
dc.relation.volume5en_US


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