General Guidelines for Methodologies on Research and Evaluation of Traditional Medicine
(2000; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] Ver el documento en el formato PDF
Índice de contenido
Ver el documentoAcknowledgements
Ver el documentoForeword
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoIntroduction
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido1. Methodologies for Research and Evaluation of Herbal Medicines
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido2. Methodologies for Research and Evaluation of Traditional Procedure-Based Therapies
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido3. Clinical Research
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido4. Other Issues and Considerations
Ver el documentoReferences
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnexes
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex I. Guidelines for the Assessment of Herbal Medicinesa
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex II. Research Guidelines for Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Herbal Medicinesa
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex III. Report of a WHO Consultation on Traditional Medicine and AIDS: Clinical Evaluation of Traditional Medicines and Natural Productsa
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex IV. Definition of Levels of Evidence and Grading of Recommendationa
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex V. Guidelines for Levels and Kinds of Evidence to Support Claims for Therapeutic Goodsa
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex VI. Guidelines for Good Clinical Practice (GCP) for Trials on Pharmaceutical Productsa
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex VII. Guidance for Industry: Significant Scientific Agreement in the Review of Health Claims for Conventional Foods and Dietary Supplementsa
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex VIII. Guideline for Good Clinical Practicea
Cerrar esta carpetaAnnex IX. WHO QOL (Quality of Life) User Manual: Facet Definitions and Response Scalesa
Ver el documentoIntroduction
Ver el documentoOverall Quality of Life and Health
Ver el documentoDomain I - Physical Domain
Ver el documentoDomain II - Psychological
Ver el documentoDomain III - Level of Independence
Ver el documentoDomain IV - Social Relationships
Ver el documentoDomain V - Environment
Ver el documentoDomain VI - Spirituality/Religion/Personal Beliefs
Ver el documentoResponse Scales
Ver el documentoAnnex X. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Methodologies for Research and Evaluation of Traditional Medicine
 

Domain III - Level of Independence

9. Mobility

This facet examines the person’s view of his/her ability to get from one place to another, to move around the home, move around the work place, or to and from transportation services.

The focus is on the person’s general ability to go wherever he/she wants to go without the help of others regardless of the means used to do so. The assumption is made that wherever a person is dependent to a significant extent for his/her mobility on another person this is likely to affect quality of life adversely. In addition, questions address people with mobility difficulties regardless of whether changes in their mobility were sudden or more gradual although it is acknowledged that this is likely to affect the impact on quality of life significantly.

A person’s impairment does not necessarily affect his/her mobility. So for example someone using a wheelchair or walking frame may have satisfactory mobility in an adequately adapted home or workplace. Nor does this facet include transportation services (e.g. car, bus) as this is covered in a separate facet (Transport).

10. Activities of daily living

The facet explores a person’s ability to perform usual daily living activities. This includes self-care and caring appropriately for property. The focus is on a person’s ability to carry out activities, which he/she is likely to need to perform on a day-to-day basis. The degree to which people are dependent on others to help them in their daily activities is also likely to affect their quality of life.

The questions do not include aspects of daily living which are covered in other areas; namely, specific activities affected by fatigue, sleep disturbances, depression, anxiety, mobility, and so on. Questions disregard whether a person has a home or a family.

11. Dependence on medication or treatments

This facet examines a person’s dependence on medication or alternative medicines (such as acupuncture and herbal remedies) for supporting his/her physical and psychological well-being. Medications may in some cases affect a person’s quality of life in a negative way (e.g. side-effects of chemotherapy) whilst in other cases it may enhance the person’s quality of life (e.g. cancer patients using pain killers).

This facet includes medical interventions that are not pharmacological but on which the person is still dependent, for example a pacemaker, artificial limb or colostomy bag. The questions do not include detailed enquiry into the type of medication.

12. Working capacity

This facet examines a person’s use of his or her energy for work. “Work” is defined as any major activity in which the person is engaged. Major activities might include paid work, unpaid work, voluntary community work, full-time study, care of children and household duties. Because such questions refer to these possible types of major activities, the facet focuses on a person’s ability to perform work, regardless of the type of work.

The questions do not include how people feel about the nature of the work that they do, nor do they include the quality of their work environment.

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