National Policy on Traditional Medicine and Regulation of Herbal Medicines - Report of a WHO Global Survey
(2005; 168 pages) Ver el documento en el formato PDF
Índice de contenido
Ver el documentoAcknowledgements
Ver el documentoExecutive summary
Ver el documentoAcronyms, abbreviations and definitions
Ver el documentoWHO Regions
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido1. Introduction
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido2. National policy on traditional medicine and complementary/alternative medicine
Cerrar esta carpeta3. The regulatory situation of herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.1 Law or regulation on herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.2 Regulatory status of herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.3 Claims
Ver el documento3.4 Pharmacopoeias
Ver el documento3.5 Monographs on herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.6 Manufacture of herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.7 Safety and herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.8 Registration system for herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.9 Herbal medicines and the essential drug list
Ver el documento3.10 Post marketing surveillance of herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.11 The sale of herbal medicines
Ver el documento3.12 Annual market sales of herbal medicines
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido4. Member States, WHO and herbal medicines
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido5. Country summaries
Ver el documentoReferences
Ver el documentoAnnex 1. Text of survey instrument
 

3.11 The sale of herbal medicines

In this question, countries were asked about the methods of sale of herbal medicine. Countries were requested to select all methods of sale employed on their territory from the following options: in pharmacies as prescription drugs; in pharmacies as over the counter drugs; in special outlets; by licensed practitioners; no restrictions on selling herbal medicines; and other ways. If “other ways” was selected, a description was requested.

A total of 137 countries reported on the location and methods of sale of herbal medicines. Figure 41 provides details of how countries responded. By far the most commonly selected category is that of sale in pharmacies as over the counter drugs, with 101 countries reporting this method of sale. Interestingly, the next most popular selection is that which states that there are no restrictions on the sale of herbal medicines, selected by 70 countries. The next most popular method of sale is in special outlets, chosen by 59 countries, followed by sale in pharmacies as prescription medicines (48 countries) and finally by licensed practitioners (30 countries).

Twenty-two countries selected the option “other ways”, including the following: peddling in markets and in ambulatory sales (e.g. selling door to door); by unlicensed practitioners; in indigenous communities; in herbal clinics and traditional healers; in health shops, supermarkets and food markets; and through mail order and multilevel marketing systems.


Figure 41. Sale of herbal medicines

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