Injection Use and Practices in Uganda - EDM Research Series No. 014
(1994; 54 pages) Ver el documento en el formato PDF
Índice de contenido
Ver el documentoACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido1. INTRODUCTION
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido2. METHODOLOGY
Cerrar esta carpeta3. EXTENT OF INJECTION USE
Ver el documento3.1 Prevalence of injection use
Ver el documento3.2 Prevalence of specific types of injections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido3.3 Sources of injections
Ver el documento3.4 Prevalence of injections at various medical facilities
Ver el documento3.5 Evaluation of the appropriateness of injection use
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido4. HYGIENE OF INJECTION PRACTICE
Ver el documento5. POPULARITY OF INJECTIONS
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Ver el documentoREFERENCES
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoLIST OF APPENDICES
Ver el documentoOTHER DOCUMENTS IN THE DAP RESEARCH SERIES
 

3.4 Prevalence of injections at various medical facilities

To establish the percentage of patients receiving an injection when visiting a medical facility, a prescription analysis at the various established medical facilities was performed. Prescription analysis for the non-formal providers is not included here since many of these specialize in injections and their injection rates approach 100%. The researchers recorded the diagnosis and treatment of the first 30 patients that visited the provider. This method reveals a high prevalence of injections at all formal health facilities for both regions. In 14 formal health facilities visited in Busoga the average prevalence of injection prescription was 68.3% - this implies that for every 10 treatments given, almost 7 included an injection (see Table 9). In Ankole, injection prescription prevalence in 12 provider facilities was 59.7% - showing that in every 10 treatments given approximately 6 of them included an injection. Although injection prescription prevalence for Ankole is lower than that of Busoga, overall the rates for both regions depict a high prevalence for injection prescription, especially in comparison with the 15% desired level for injection prescription stipulated by UEDMP.

Table 9: Percentage of patients at various established health facilities who received at least one injection based on analysis of 30 prescriptions per facility in Busoga and Ankole Regions

 

Busoga (Eastern Uganda) facilities n=14

Ankole (Western Uganda) facilities n=12

Busoga (Eastern Uganda) prescript. n=420

Ankole (Western Uganda) prescript. n=360

Government facilities:

       

Hospital

1

2

90,0%
(27/30)

38.3%
(23/60)

Health centre

4

 

65.8%
(79/120)

-

NGO health centre

3

-

633%
(57/90)

-

Private facilities

6

10

68.9%
(124/180)

64.0%
(192/300)

Mean % of injection prescription in all health facilities

   

68.3%
(287/420)

59.7%
(215/360)

With respect to the treatment prescribed, it is noteworthy that in both regions over 95% of all injections prescribed were chloroquine, Procaine Penicillin Fortified (PPF) and Crystalline Penicillin. In Busoga, there are indications that providers prescribe more than one drug in injectable form especially for patients who presented with fever and cough. The combination given is invariably PPF and chloroquine. This phenomenon is basically the result of poor diagnostic capacity: fever is treated as malaria and cough as a bacterial infection without laboratory confirmation. Combined injection prescription constituted 20% of all injection prescriptions written in both remote and semi-rural communities while the proportion was only 11% in the urban areas. The lower prevalence of combined injection prescriptions in the urban communities may be explained by the use of laboratory tests to confirm the diagnosis of malaria. In the remote and semi-rural areas these services are absent.

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