Injection Use and Practices in Uganda - EDM Research Series No. 014
(1994; 54 pages) Ver el documento en el formato PDF
Índice de contenido
Ver el documentoACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido1. INTRODUCTION
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido2. METHODOLOGY
Cerrar esta carpeta3. EXTENT OF INJECTION USE
Ver el documento3.1 Prevalence of injection use
Ver el documento3.2 Prevalence of specific types of injections
Cerrar esta carpeta3.3 Sources of injections
Ver el documento3.3.1 Home possession of injection equipment and injectables
Ver el documento3.3.2 Qualifications of provider who administered last injection
Ver el documento3.4 Prevalence of injections at various medical facilities
Ver el documento3.5 Evaluation of the appropriateness of injection use
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido4. HYGIENE OF INJECTION PRACTICE
Ver el documento5. POPULARITY OF INJECTIONS
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Ver el documentoREFERENCES
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoLIST OF APPENDICES
Ver el documentoOTHER DOCUMENTS IN THE DAP RESEARCH SERIES
 

3.3.2 Qualifications of provider who administered last injection

In Busoga, attention was also extended to the training of the person who administered the last injection, and results show that out of 359 injections administered, 178 (49.6%) were administered by persons with no formal training, 170 (47.4%) by trained staff, and 11 (3.0%) by physicians (see Table 8), The qualifications of the person actually administering the injection cannot be assumed on the basis of where the injection was given. People without formal training, commonly nursing aids, were found giving injections in government health units, while trained nurses or midwives sometimes gave injections to their neighbours in their homes.

Table 8: Qualifications of provider who administered last injection in Busoga Region

 

Frequency
n=359

Percentage

Person without formal training

178

49.6%

Nurse, midwife, allied staff

170

47.4%

Physician

11

3.0%

In the remote and semi-rural areas, non-biomedically trained providers are often relatives who offer a free service or persons within the locality who charge reasonably or offer credit services, It is most unlikely that a patient will travel a long distance to seek injection treatment, especially if in the neighbourhood there is some one who can provide the same service. Survey results show that various community members comprise one of the major sources of injection treatment. People obtain treatment from someone they already know or from someone recommended by family or friends. For example, of the 360 households visited in Busoga, 115 of them reported having received injections from a neighbour, relative, friend, parent, family doctor or locally recommended provider. Giving an injection is seen as a technical exercise. Rural lay people seem to assume that anybody who has adequate familiarity with the gadgets involved can provide an injection and cure the ill. In fact, some people mentioned that injections were substantively the same whether provided by biomedically trained or untrained persons.

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