Injection Use and Practices in Uganda - EDM Research Series No. 014
(1994; 54 pages) Ver el documento en el formato PDF
Índice de contenido
Ver el documentoACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido1. INTRODUCTION
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido2. METHODOLOGY
Cerrar esta carpeta3. EXTENT OF INJECTION USE
Ver el documento3.1 Prevalence of injection use
Ver el documento3.2 Prevalence of specific types of injections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido3.3 Sources of injections
Ver el documento3.4 Prevalence of injections at various medical facilities
Ver el documento3.5 Evaluation of the appropriateness of injection use
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido4. HYGIENE OF INJECTION PRACTICE
Ver el documento5. POPULARITY OF INJECTIONS
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenido6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Ver el documentoREFERENCES
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoLIST OF APPENDICES
Ver el documentoOTHER DOCUMENTS IN THE DAP RESEARCH SERIES
 

3.2 Prevalence of specific types of injections

Data based on the confined two week recall period indicates that the great majority of injections were therapeutic injections (see Table 5). In Busoga, in the 93 households that received an injection during the two week recall period, 87 (93.5%) of them received therapeutic injections and six (6.5%) received immunizations. No infusions or contraceptive injections were recorded, A similar trend is reflected in findings for Ankole: in the 108 households that received injections, 84 (77.8%) of them received therapeutic injections and 24 (22.2%) immunizations. In Ankole also there were no infusions or contraceptive injections.

Table 5; Percentage of households that received a specific type of injection in the confined two week recall period in Busoga and Ankole Regions

 

Busoga
(Eastern Uganda) n=93

Ankole
(Western Uganda) n=108

Therapeutic injections

93.5%
(87)

77.8%
(84)

Immunizations

6.5%
(6)

22.2%
(24)

Infusions

0

0

Contraceptive injections

0

0

These results are not surprising as immunizations and injections for contraception are taken for preventive purposes during confined periods by a specified age group. Therapeutic injections can be administered anytime anyone is sick. These injections are also more readily available. In Uganda, infusions and immunizations are not administered by informal providers. In Busoga, for instance, access to immunization and infusions was restricted to well-established medical facilities. In the remote areas, these are poorly equipped or non-existent. In one remote community, the refrigeration system at the local dispensary had broken down a year ago, while in another remote community there was simply no established health facility. Infusions are known to be administered to patients who are in a critical state, i.e. in cases of acute dehydration, anemia, after an operation and also for inducing birth. Therefore, to the local people this type of injection signifies pain and death. The majority of local informal injection providers indicated that they would never administer any form of injection to a person who was in a critical state. It is for these various reasons that infusions are not so popular. Contraceptive injections have different associations making them unappealing to local people: they are associated with infertility and irregular menstruation.

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