Documento completo  |  Capítulo completo  |  Expandir índice  |  Versión HTML imprimible
WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] Ver el documento en el formato PDF
Índice de contenido
Ver el documentoPreface
Ver el documentoIntroduction
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoParasitic infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoSuperficial fungal infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoSubcutaneous fungal infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoBacterial infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoViral infections
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoEczematous diseases
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoScaling diseases
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoPapulosquamous diseases
Ver el documentoCutaneous reactions to drugs
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoPigmentary disorders
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoPhotodermatoses
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoBullous dermatoses
Ver el documentoAlopecia areata
Ver el documentoUrticaria
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoConditions common in children
Ver el documentoAcne vulgaris
Ver el documentoPruritus
Ver el documentoTropical ulcers
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAntimicrobial drugs
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAntifugal drugs
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAntiseptic agents
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoScabicides and pediculicides
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoMiscellaneous drugs
Abrir esta carpeta y ver su contenidoAnnex
Ver el documentoSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
Ver el documentoBack cover
 

Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata, which is presumed to be immunologically mediated, is a relatively common disease that affects the hair. It is characterized by one or more oval or circular patches of non-scarring hair loss on an otherwise normal scalp. When the disease is active, hairs at the margins of these patches may be removed by light traction. Diffuse thinning of hair sometimes occurs in the early stages and in severe cases the lesions may extend, resulting ultimately in total hair loss. Diffuse fine pitting of the nails has been reported in over half the patients presenting with alopecia areata.

Alopecia areata most often appears in childhood or early adult life but it can occur at any age. In some patients there is a family history. In two-thirds of the cases, partial or complete regrowth of hair occurs within 5 years. After this time spontaneous recovery is unusual. Patchy hair loss is seen in secondary syphilis, but it is usually easily differentiated by history, other physical findings, and a more irregular “moth-eaten” appearance. Tinea capitis may also cause patchy hair loss, particularly in children.

Management

The response to treatment is uncertain and beneficial results are often short-lasting. It has been claimed that early treatment may limit extension of the lesions, while untreated cases become unresponsive. Drug therapy is rarely warranted in children and adolescents, or when the condition is stable. In patients with extensive hair loss, a wig or partial hairpiece provides a more satisfactory solution.

Localized regrowth of hair may be stimulated by application of a topical corticosteroid such as hydrocortisone acetate or of a keratolytic agent such as dithranol or tretinoin. Systemic corticosteroids are rarely (if ever) used, given their dangers and the uncertain response, and the recurrence of hair loss after they are discontinued. PUVA therapy is sometimes effective in unresponsive cases.

 

Ir a la sección anterior
Ir a la siguiente sección
 
 
El Portal de Información - Medicamentos Esenciales y Productos de Salud de la OMS fue diseñado y es mantenido por la ONG Human Info. Última actualización: le 29 octubre 2018