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Guidelines for Drug Donations - Revised 1999
(1999; 24 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentChanges incorporated into the 1999 edition
View the documentI. Introduction
View the documentII. The need for guidelines
View the documentIII. Core principles
Open this folder and view contentsIV. Guidelines for drug donations
Open this folder and view contentsV. Other ways donors can help
Open this folder and view contentsVI. How to implement a policy on drug donations
View the documentAnnex: Examples of problems with drug donations
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentReferences
View the documentBack Cover
 

III. Core principles

The twelve articles of the Guidelines for Drug Donations are based on four core principles. The first and paramount principle is that a drug donation should benefit the recipient to the maximum extent possible. This implies that all donations should be based on an expressed need and that unsolicited drug donations are to be discouraged. The second principle is that a donation should be made with full respect for the wishes and authority of the recipient, and be supportive of existing government health policies and administrative arrangements. The third principle is that there should be no double standards in quality: if the quality of an item is unacceptable in the donor country, it is also unacceptable as a donation. The fourth principle is that there should be effective communication between the donor and the recipient: donations should be based on an expressed need and should not be sent unannounced.

Core principles for a donation

1. Maximum benefit to the recipient
2. Respect for wishes and authority of the recipient
3. No double standards in quality
4. Effective communication between donor and recipient

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