Guide to Good Prescribing - A Practical Manual
(1994; 115 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentWhy you need this book
Open this folder and view contentsPart 1: Overview
Open this folder and view contentsPart 2: Selecting your P(ersonal) drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPart 3: Treating your patients
Open this folder and view contentsPart 4: Keeping up-to-date
Close this folderAnnexes
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 1: Essentials of pharmacology in daily practice
View the documentAnnex 2: Essential references
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 3: How to explain the use of some dosage forms
Close this folderAnnex 4. The use of injections
View the documentGeneral practical aspects of injecting
View the documentCHECKLIST 1. Aspirating from ampoules (glass, plastic)
View the documentCHECKLIST 2. Aspirating from a vial
View the documentCHECKLIST 3. Dissolving dry medicine
View the documentCHECKLIST 4. Subcutaneous injection
View the documentCHECKLIST 5. Intramuscular injection
View the documentCHECKLIST 6. Intravenous injection
View the documentBack Cover
 

Annex 4. The use of injections

There are two main reasons to prescribe an injection. The first is because a fast effect is needed, and the second is because the injection is the only dosage form available that has the required effect. A prescriber should know how to give injections, not only for emergency and other situations where it might be necessary, but also because it will sometimes be necessary to instruct other health workers (e.g. a nurse) or the patients themselves.

Many injections are prescribed which are unnecessarily dangerous and inconvenient. Nearly always they are much more expensive than tablets, capsules and other dosage forms. For every injection the prescriber should strike a balance between the medical need on the one hand and the risk of side effects, inconvenience and cost on the other.

When a drug is injected certain effects are expected, and also some side effects. The person giving the injection must know what these effects are, and must also know how to react if something goes wrong. This means that if you do not give the injection yourself you must make sure that it is done by someone who is qualified.

A prescriber is also responsible for how waste is disposed of after the injection. The needle and sometimes the syringe are contaminated waste and special measures are needed for their disposal. A patient who injects at home must also be aware of this problem.

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