Guide to Good Prescribing - A Practical Manual
(1994; 115 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentWhy you need this book
Open this folder and view contentsPart 1: Overview
Open this folder and view contentsPart 2: Selecting your P(ersonal) drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPart 3: Treating your patients
Open this folder and view contentsPart 4: Keeping up-to-date
Close this folderAnnexes
Close this folderAnnex 1: Essentials of pharmacology in daily practice
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsPharmacodynamics
Open this folder and view contentsPharmacokinetics
Open this folder and view contentsDrug treatment
Close this folderSpecial features of the curve
View the documentLoading dose
View the documentSlowly raising initial dose
View the documentTapering the dose
View the documentAnnex 2: Essential references
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 3: How to explain the use of some dosage forms
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 4. The use of injections
View the documentBack Cover
 
Tapering the dose

Sometimes the human body gets used to the presence of a certain drug and physiological systems are adjusted to its presence. To prevent rebound symptoms the treatment cannot be abruptly stopped but must be tailed off to enable the body to readjust. To do this the dose should be lowered in small steps each time a new steady state is reached. Table 8 in Chapter 11 lists the most important drugs for which the dosage should be decreased slowly.

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