Guide to Good Prescribing - A Practical Manual
(1994; 115 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentWhy you need this book
Open this folder and view contentsPart 1: Overview
Open this folder and view contentsPart 2: Selecting your P(ersonal) drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPart 3: Treating your patients
Open this folder and view contentsPart 4: Keeping up-to-date
Close this folderAnnexes
Close this folderAnnex 1: Essentials of pharmacology in daily practice
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsPharmacodynamics
Open this folder and view contentsPharmacokinetics
Open this folder and view contentsDrug treatment
Close this folderSpecial features of the curve
View the documentLoading dose
View the documentSlowly raising initial dose
View the documentTapering the dose
View the documentAnnex 2: Essential references
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 3: How to explain the use of some dosage forms
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 4. The use of injections
View the documentBack Cover
 
Slowly raising initial dose

Some drugs cannot be used in full dosage at once. There are three possible reasons for this. The first reason is when a drug has a narrow therapeutic window or a large variation in location of the therapeutic window in individuals. The aim is to get slowly within the window, without an overshoot. This is called dose-finding. A second reason is variation in kinetics among different patients. A third is to induce tolerance of side effects. The rule is ‘go low, go slow’.

As mentioned earlier, it takes about 4 half-lives to reach a steady state. This means that you should not raise the dose before this time has elapsed and you have verified that no unwanted effects have occurred. Table 7 in Chapter 8 lists drugs in which slowly raising the dose is usually recommended.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: November 5, 2014