Guide to Good Prescribing - A Practical Manual
(1994; 115 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentWhy you need this book
Open this folder and view contentsPart 1: Overview
Open this folder and view contentsPart 2: Selecting your P(ersonal) drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPart 3: Treating your patients
Open this folder and view contentsPart 4: Keeping up-to-date
Close this folderAnnexes
Close this folderAnnex 1: Essentials of pharmacology in daily practice
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsPharmacodynamics
Open this folder and view contentsPharmacokinetics
Open this folder and view contentsDrug treatment
Close this folderSpecial features of the curve
View the documentLoading dose
View the documentSlowly raising initial dose
View the documentTapering the dose
View the documentAnnex 2: Essential references
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 3: How to explain the use of some dosage forms
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 4. The use of injections
View the documentBack Cover
 
Loading dose

There may be reasons to use another schedule. In steady state the total amount of drug in the body remains constant. If you want to reach this state quickly you can administer at once the total amount of drug which is present in the body in steady state (Figure 19). What quantity is then needed? Theoretically you will need the mean plasma concentration, multiplied by the distribution volume. In the majority of cases these figures can be found in pharmacology books, or may be obtained from the pharmacist or the manufacturer. For several drugs fixed schedules exist, e.g. for digoxin.


Figure 19: Loading dose

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