Starting or Strengthening a Drug Bulletin - A Practical Manual
(2005; 165 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentHow the manual was produced
View the documentAbout ISDB
View the documentExecutive summary
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Rational use of medicines
Close this folder3. What are drug bulletins?
View the document3.1 Definition
View the document3.2 The history of drug bulletins
View the document3.3 What makes an ‘independent’ drug bulletin independent?
View the document3.4 Types of editorial content
View the document3.5 Styles of communicating information
View the document3.6 The institutional base
View the document3.7 References
Open this folder and view contents4. Defining aims, target and type of bulletin
Open this folder and view contents5. Planning resources
Open this folder and view contents6. Planning bulletin production: schedules and timing
Open this folder and view contents7. The editorial process
Open this folder and view contents8. Reviewing a new drug: is it a therapeutic advance?
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexe to Chapter 8: Evaluating harm
Open this folder and view contents9. Design and production
Open this folder and view contents10. Dissemination
Open this folder and view contents11. Organizational and legal issues
Open this folder and view contents12. Evaluating quality and usefulness
Open this folder and view contents13. Partnership and collaboration
Open this folder and view contents14. Keeping records and creating a memory
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix: Electronic sources of information
 

3.6 The institutional base

A bulletin usually needs an institutional base. Local opportunity largely determines what this is. The spectrum ranges from a bulletin housed in a Health Ministry to a health insurance organization, a consumer organization, a professional association, a university department, or a non-governmental organization. Some bulletins have their own independent institutional base and are legally incorporated as a company or a non-profit organization. A bulletin housed within a parent organization needs a structure that allows the editors the freedom to do their job and to control editorial content. On the other hand, a parent organization can offer the advantage of taking responsibility for financial management and protecting the bulletin against legal threats. Chapter 11 discusses the pros and cons of different types of institutional and legal structures.

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