Starting or Strengthening a Drug Bulletin - A Practical Manual
(2005; 165 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentHow the manual was produced
View the documentAbout ISDB
View the documentExecutive summary
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Rational use of medicines
Open this folder and view contents3. What are drug bulletins?
Open this folder and view contents4. Defining aims, target and type of bulletin
Open this folder and view contents5. Planning resources
Open this folder and view contents6. Planning bulletin production: schedules and timing
Open this folder and view contents7. The editorial process
Open this folder and view contents8. Reviewing a new drug: is it a therapeutic advance?
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexe to Chapter 8: Evaluating harm
Open this folder and view contents9. Design and production
Open this folder and view contents10. Dissemination
Open this folder and view contents11. Organizational and legal issues
Close this folder12. Evaluating quality and usefulness
View the document12.1 Introduction
View the document12.2 Evaluation brings many benefits
View the document12.3 Three approaches: audit, feedback and impact assessment
View the document12.4 Start with your own evaluation of the bulletin
Open this folder and view contents12.5 Assessing readers' opinions of the bulletin
View the document12.6 Evaluating the impact of the bulletin
View the document12.7 Feedback is achievable and invaluable
View the document12.8 Simple observations can tell a lot
View the document12.9 References
Open this folder and view contents13. Partnership and collaboration
Open this folder and view contents14. Keeping records and creating a memory
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix: Electronic sources of information
 

12.3 Three approaches: audit, feedback and impact assessment

Evaluating a drug bulletin involves finding out whether it is meeting certain objectives. These objectives could relate to quality, level of readership, usefulness of articles, or influence on the reader’s knowledge, attitude or actual prescribing behaviour.

There is no single correct way to evaluate a drug bulletin. Research involving quantitative data collection (direct measurements of what is happening) is not necessarily better than research involving qualitative data (measurements of attitudes, beliefs etc. showing why something is happening). What is important is that research, whatever type is chosen, is carried out rigorously so that there can be confidence in the validity of the results.

The choice of evaluation depends primarily on the intended objective. You may want to start with a self-evaluation of the quality of the bulletin, and then move on to evaluate the usefulness of the information to the reader. When your bulletin is well established, has a committed readership and has been running smoothly for a period of time, you may want to undertake an impact evaluation.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: November 5, 2014