Starting or Strengthening a Drug Bulletin - A Practical Manual
(2005; 165 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentHow the manual was produced
View the documentAbout ISDB
View the documentExecutive summary
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Rational use of medicines
Open this folder and view contents3. What are drug bulletins?
Open this folder and view contents4. Defining aims, target and type of bulletin
Open this folder and view contents5. Planning resources
Open this folder and view contents6. Planning bulletin production: schedules and timing
Open this folder and view contents7. The editorial process
Open this folder and view contents8. Reviewing a new drug: is it a therapeutic advance?
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexe to Chapter 8: Evaluating harm
Close this folder9. Design and production
View the document9.1 Elements of good design
View the document9.2 Creating the design
View the document9.3 Using images
View the document9.4 The production process
View the document9.5 Developing a house style
View the document9.6 Ensuring accuracy - proof reading
View the document9.7 Printing
View the document9.8 Electronic publishing
View the document9.9 Further reading
Open this folder and view contents10. Dissemination
Open this folder and view contents11. Organizational and legal issues
Open this folder and view contents12. Evaluating quality and usefulness
Open this folder and view contents13. Partnership and collaboration
Open this folder and view contents14. Keeping records and creating a memory
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix: Electronic sources of information
 

9.3 Using images

Many bulletins include images in the form of photographs, drawings or cartoons. These are used to clarify the messages, to show what words cannot easily express, and can also be used to entertain the reader. Some bulletins have a picture on the front cover. For example, The Network’s Drug Bulletin (Pakistan) and la revue Prescrire (France) usually have drawings or cartoons on the cover and inside the bulletin; the Sri Lanka Prescriber includes illustrations produced by local medical students on its front covers.

Case study: Bulletin d'Information du Médicament et de Pharmacovigilance

Use of photography. In our article about body surface area1, we included a photograph that was originally in the 1914 publication by Dubois and Dubois describing the derivation of the formula for body surface area (the photo was of a child born with severe hypothyroidism and the paper cast of his body). We received many congratulations from our readers for having found and published this original photography.

Use of drawings and cartoons to inform and entertain. In our article about compression stockings in the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery2, many readers enjoyed the ''Giraffe model and drawings'', and the “interview” with a giraffe explaining why it didn't suffer from ‘heavy legs’ (an extract from a novel by Primo Levi).

1. Loewert M. Concept de surface corporelle historique et pertinence dans l’adaptation posologique [“Body surface area: historical aspects and relevance in drug dosing”]. Bulletin d'Information du Médicament et de Pharmacovigilance 2003; 105.

2. Rose F-X. Les bas de contention dans la prévention des thromboses veineuses profondes en chirurgie. [Compression stockings in prevention of deep vein thrombosis after surgery]. Bulletin d'Information du Médicament et de Pharmacovigilance. 2002; 102.

Contributed by Michel le Duff, Bulletin d'Information du Médicament et de Pharmacovigilance, France.

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