Starting or Strengthening a Drug Bulletin - A Practical Manual
(2005; 165 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentHow the manual was produced
View the documentAbout ISDB
View the documentExecutive summary
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Rational use of medicines
Open this folder and view contents3. What are drug bulletins?
Open this folder and view contents4. Defining aims, target and type of bulletin
Open this folder and view contents5. Planning resources
Open this folder and view contents6. Planning bulletin production: schedules and timing
Open this folder and view contents7. The editorial process
Close this folder8. Reviewing a new drug: is it a therapeutic advance?
View the document8.1 Introduction
View the document8.2 When is a new treatment a therapeutic advance?
Open this folder and view contents8.3 Collecting evidence about the drug
Open this folder and view contents8.4 Evaluation in terms of efficacy, harm and convenience
Open this folder and view contents8.5 Judging the overall value of the drug
Open this folder and view contents8.6 Cost
View the document8.7 What patients need to know
View the document8.8 References
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexe to Chapter 8: Evaluating harm
Open this folder and view contents9. Design and production
Open this folder and view contents10. Dissemination
Open this folder and view contents11. Organizational and legal issues
Open this folder and view contents12. Evaluating quality and usefulness
Open this folder and view contents13. Partnership and collaboration
Open this folder and view contents14. Keeping records and creating a memory
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix: Electronic sources of information
 

8.7 What patients need to know

Information for health professionals often only deals with what the health professional needs to know. It can be helpful to think about what the patient will want and need to know about the treatment, and to include this in a section of your article. For drug bulletins aimed at patients or the public, information for patients is essential. It might be valuable to prepare a model patient information leaflet for the drug that health professionals can give to patients. In some countries, including those in the European Union, pharmaceutical companies are required by law to include a patient information leaflet in the drug packaging. However, these are often too long and/or stereotyped, and include too much unimportant information that conceals the really important information.

Information and instructions for patients should be well balanced and explain the likely benefits and harms with short-term and long-term use of the drug. Information should be given on the individual adverse reactions (including the symptoms the patients is likely to experience as a result of the adverse reactions), when and how to stop taking the drug, or how to modify the dose according to the relief of symptoms or the development of new signs and symptoms.

Box 8.9 Examples of information for patients

Worst Pills, Best Pills (Public Citizen Health Research Group)
[http://www.citizen.org/]

Treatment Notes [http://www.dtb.org.uk/dtb/tnotes/titles.htm]

Kusuri-no-Check [http://www.npojip.org/english/check-up1/check-up03.htm]

United States Pharmacopeia-DI (Advice for the Patient) - searchable via Medline Plus
[http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginformation.html]

DIPEx [http://www.dipex.org]

The Australian National Prescribing Service has links to consumer-friendly resources
[http://www.nps.org.au]

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