Starting or Strengthening a Drug Bulletin - A Practical Manual
(2005; 165 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentHow the manual was produced
View the documentAbout ISDB
View the documentExecutive summary
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Rational use of medicines
Open this folder and view contents3. What are drug bulletins?
Open this folder and view contents4. Defining aims, target and type of bulletin
Open this folder and view contents5. Planning resources
Open this folder and view contents6. Planning bulletin production: schedules and timing
Open this folder and view contents7. The editorial process
Close this folder8. Reviewing a new drug: is it a therapeutic advance?
View the document8.1 Introduction
View the document8.2 When is a new treatment a therapeutic advance?
Open this folder and view contents8.3 Collecting evidence about the drug
Open this folder and view contents8.4 Evaluation in terms of efficacy, harm and convenience
Open this folder and view contents8.5 Judging the overall value of the drug
Close this folder8.6 Cost
View the document8.6.1 Compare costs in the light of true therapeutic value
View the document8.6.2 Comparisons should be appropriate and practical
View the document8.6.3 Bear in mind additional costs for using drugs
View the document8.7 What patients need to know
View the document8.8 References
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexe to Chapter 8: Evaluating harm
Open this folder and view contents9. Design and production
Open this folder and view contents10. Dissemination
Open this folder and view contents11. Organizational and legal issues
Open this folder and view contents12. Evaluating quality and usefulness
Open this folder and view contents13. Partnership and collaboration
Open this folder and view contents14. Keeping records and creating a memory
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix: Electronic sources of information
 

8.6.2 Comparisons should be appropriate and practical

Price comparisons should be based on the usual daily dose (or other appropriate dose), the appropriate pack size and should include at least one comparator drug (standard therapy, if available, and/or the drug(s) which has been compared with the new drug in the clinical trials. The price comparison should also cover an appropriate period of time - for instance one month for drugs which are taken long term. Antibiotics can be compared on the basis of the usual lengths of a course of treatment. Comparisons on a price-per-day basis may be misleading.

Case study: Dialogo sui Farmaci, Italy

When a new drug is launched that is a ‘me-too’ drug, the Italian bulletin Dialogo sui Farmaci compares the cost of the drug with other drugs in the same class, e.g. rosuvastatin versus other statins (see Figure 8.2). If instead, the new drug belongs to a new class (e.g. teriparatide for osteoporosis), the cost is compared with that of the drugs and doses used in the clinical trials of efficacy (see Figure 8.3). If the drug has been only tested against placebo, the reference drugs are those considered as first-line or standard therapy for such a condition.

Contributed by Maria Font, Dialogo sui Farmaci, Italy [http://www.dialogosuifarmaci.it].

 

Source: Dialogo sui Farmaci, Italy.


Figure 8.2 Cost comparison among "me-too" drugs statins: 28 day treatment cost

Source: Dialogo sui Farmaci, Italy.


Figure 8.3 Cost comparison between new and standard drugs teriparatide and bisphosphonates: cost of 28 days' treatment

Source: Dialogo sui Farmaci, Italy.


Table 8.1 Approximate drug cost of 1 year's treatment in the UK*

Statin

Licensed daily dosage

Cost

atorvastatin

10 - 80 mg

£246 - £613

cerivastatin**

100 - 400 µg

£169 - £226

fluvastatin

20 - 80 mg

£166 - £209

pravastatin

10 - 40 mg

£211 - £387

simvastatin

10 - 80 mg

£235 - £387

 
 

* Costs calculated from Drug Tariff and Chemist & Druggist prices, where available.
**Cerivastatin was withdrawn from the market worldwide in 2001

The drug costs of treatment for intermediate dosages of statins (e.g. atorvastatin or simvastatin) may be greater than for maximum dosages.

 

Source: Statin therapy - what now? Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin 2001; 39:17-21.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: November 5, 2014