Starting or Strengthening a Drug Bulletin - A Practical Manual
(2005; 165 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentHow the manual was produced
View the documentAbout ISDB
View the documentExecutive summary
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Rational use of medicines
Open this folder and view contents3. What are drug bulletins?
Open this folder and view contents4. Defining aims, target and type of bulletin
Open this folder and view contents5. Planning resources
Open this folder and view contents6. Planning bulletin production: schedules and timing
Open this folder and view contents7. The editorial process
Close this folder8. Reviewing a new drug: is it a therapeutic advance?
View the document8.1 Introduction
View the document8.2 When is a new treatment a therapeutic advance?
Close this folder8.3 Collecting evidence about the drug
View the document8.3.1 Where to find evidence on new drugs?
View the document8.3.2 What about using unpublished information?
Open this folder and view contents8.4 Evaluation in terms of efficacy, harm and convenience
Open this folder and view contents8.5 Judging the overall value of the drug
Open this folder and view contents8.6 Cost
View the document8.7 What patients need to know
View the document8.8 References
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexe to Chapter 8: Evaluating harm
Open this folder and view contents9. Design and production
Open this folder and view contents10. Dissemination
Open this folder and view contents11. Organizational and legal issues
Open this folder and view contents12. Evaluating quality and usefulness
Open this folder and view contents13. Partnership and collaboration
Open this folder and view contents14. Keeping records and creating a memory
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix: Electronic sources of information
 

8.3.2 What about using unpublished information?

There may be little or no published clinical trial data available when a drug is new. There is a variation in opinion among drug bulletin editors on the use of unpublished information, such as company data on file, and incomplete information, such as that published only as abstracts. Reasons for avoiding unpublished information are that it has not been peer-reviewed, and cannot be independently assessed by the bulletin’s readers. However, this approach may miss important parts of the picture, because studies with positive results are more likely to be published than those with negative results (i.e. no efficacy and/or with more serious adverse effects).4 Whatever the policy of your bulletin, it is important that it is transparent so that your readers know the basis of the advice. Some bulletins give a precise description of the documents they used in preparing an article and how they obtained them. This is useful for the bulletin’s readers, and also to show those who may disagree with the recommendations of the article that the article is robust.

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