Starting or Strengthening a Drug Bulletin - A Practical Manual
(2005; 165 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentHow the manual was produced
View the documentAbout ISDB
View the documentExecutive summary
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Rational use of medicines
Open this folder and view contents3. What are drug bulletins?
Open this folder and view contents4. Defining aims, target and type of bulletin
Open this folder and view contents5. Planning resources
Open this folder and view contents6. Planning bulletin production: schedules and timing
Close this folder7. The editorial process
View the document7.1 Outline of the editorial process
Open this folder and view contents7.2 Editing a drug bulletin
Open this folder and view contents7.3 Writing bulletin articles
Close this folder7.4 Reviewing the article
View the document7.4.1 How many people should review an article?
View the document7.4.2 Should a bulletin set up a permanent review board?
View the document7.4.3 Should readers be included in the review board?
View the document7.4.4 Should patients or lay people be included?
View the document7.4.5 Should the pharmaceutical industry review drafts?
View the document7.4.6 Tips for reviewing articles
View the document7.4.7 Rewarding reviewers
View the document7.5. Rewriting the article
View the document7.6 Final checks
Open this folder and view contents7.7 Follow-up after publication
View the document7.8 References
Open this folder and view contents8. Reviewing a new drug: is it a therapeutic advance?
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexe to Chapter 8: Evaluating harm
Open this folder and view contents9. Design and production
Open this folder and view contents10. Dissemination
Open this folder and view contents11. Organizational and legal issues
Open this folder and view contents12. Evaluating quality and usefulness
Open this folder and view contents13. Partnership and collaboration
Open this folder and view contents14. Keeping records and creating a memory
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix: Electronic sources of information
 

7.4.1 How many people should review an article?

Here again quantity does not mean quality. A large reviewing board of skilled persons from different scientific and non-scientific areas (doctors, pharmacists, nurses, working in hospital and in the community, etc.) is certainly helpful, but a team of two people including a motivated, well-trained physician and a patient with experience in critical analysis may already be effective. Large review boards require management skills and a lot of follow up. Some types of articles and some uncontroversial topics require fewer reviewers than others and fewer cycles of review.

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