How to Develop a National Formulary Based on the WHO Model Formulary - A Practical Guide
(2004; 45 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAbbreviations
Open this folder and view contents1 INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2 OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL FORMULARY PROCESS
Open this folder and view contents3 DEVELOPING THE PRELIMINARY INFORMATION SECTION
Open this folder and view contents4 DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC INFORMATION AND MONOGRAPHS USING THE WHO MODEL FORMULARY
Open this folder and view contents5 ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Open this folder and view contents6 DEVELOPING SPECIFIC INFORMATION SECTIONS
Close this folder7 PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLEMENTATION
View the documentProduction of the paper-based formulary
View the documentFinal editing and layout of manuscript
Close this folderUtilizing the electronic version of the WHO model formulary
View the documentEditing of final text
View the documentPrinting
View the documentDistribution
View the documentElectronic publishing and distribution of the national formulary
View the documentImplementation to gain acceptance and credibility for the national formulary
Open this folder and view contents8 EVALUATION
Open this folder and view contents9 REVIEW AND UPDATE
View the documentREFERENCES
 

Distribution

Timely and targeted distribution will be a key factor for successful application and use of the NF, and the following issues should be considered:

The method of distribution chosen should ensure that copies of the NF are delivered promptly to the targeted audience and do not remain in boxes in hospital or library storerooms. Posters, circulars, letters to heads of medical and nursing units can be sent to inform users on when and where to collect their copies. Existing medicine distribution systems may be utilized for rapid delivery to individual health facilities throughout the country.

• If mailing is used for distribution of the NF to individuals or institutions, it is essential that the mailing list is checked for accuracy of names and addresses. It should list only those who should be receiving the NF to reduce waste of resources on mailing costs and lost and unused copies.

Price. NFs are frequently provided free of charge to targeted health professionals in the public health sector of the country to ensure equal access. Additional copies may be provided either free, or at a cost, to other users such as private health care providers and students in private institutions who request copies of the NF.

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