How to Develop a National Formulary Based on the WHO Model Formulary - A Practical Guide
(2004; 45 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAbbreviations
Open this folder and view contents1 INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2 OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL FORMULARY PROCESS
Open this folder and view contents3 DEVELOPING THE PRELIMINARY INFORMATION SECTION
Open this folder and view contents4 DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC INFORMATION AND MONOGRAPHS USING THE WHO MODEL FORMULARY
Open this folder and view contents5 ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Open this folder and view contents6 DEVELOPING SPECIFIC INFORMATION SECTIONS
Close this folder7 PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLEMENTATION
View the documentProduction of the paper-based formulary
View the documentFinal editing and layout of manuscript
Close this folderUtilizing the electronic version of the WHO model formulary
View the documentEditing of final text
View the documentPrinting
View the documentDistribution
View the documentElectronic publishing and distribution of the national formulary
View the documentImplementation to gain acceptance and credibility for the national formulary
Open this folder and view contents8 EVALUATION
Open this folder and view contents9 REVIEW AND UPDATE
View the documentREFERENCES
 

Printing

Good-quality printing and binding can prevent premature “falling apart” of the NF and can ensure the desired “life” of the publication. Looking at examples of published manuals designed for everyday use can help with decisions on printing design. The following should be considered when planning for a NF:

The size of the formulary. Pocket-sized books that fit easily in the hand and into the pocket of white coats are preferred for ease of use and carrying around in various settings. Inappropriate size and weight of a NF can be a major barrier to its everyday use.

Paper quality. The paper quality should be chosen to ensure ease of use and durability while not making the book too heavy or too thick to carry around.

Covers. The covers should be durable and attractive. They should also show the publishing organization or government department logo.

Colour or monochrome printing. Although colour printing can give the NF an attractive appearance, its cost is often prohibitive in developing countries. Using two colours as in the British national formulary can help quick navigation. When using monochrome printing, selecting different coloured papers for certain chapters (e.g. for the appendices) can make the NF more “appealing” and can assist the user to find specific sections quickly.

The number of copies to be printed. The number of targeted users should be estimated in advance and the final print run should take into account the need for additional copies to meet unforeseen demand or to replace copies lost as a result of wear and tear. The planned frequency of revisions, the additional number of professionals likely to enter into service during that period and the number of students in training should be considered in making the estimates.

Copyright issues. Copyright laws and registration of copyright can vary from country to country and it will be necessary to check national legislation. The publisher of the NF may grant permission for its partial or full reproduction. Information regarding reproduction and how to apply for permission to do so should be included in the copyright statement.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: November 5, 2014