How to Develop a National Formulary Based on the WHO Model Formulary - A Practical Guide
(2004; 45 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAbbreviations
Open this folder and view contents1 INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2 OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL FORMULARY PROCESS
Open this folder and view contents3 DEVELOPING THE PRELIMINARY INFORMATION SECTION
Open this folder and view contents4 DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC INFORMATION AND MONOGRAPHS USING THE WHO MODEL FORMULARY
Close this folder5 ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
View the documentThe evidence-based approach in formulary development
View the documentInformation retrieval
Close this folderTypes of source
View the documentPrimary information sources
View the documentSecondary information sources
View the documentTertiary information sources
View the documentManufacturer’s literature
Open this folder and view contentsSearching for the best evidence
Open this folder and view contentsAccessibility
View the documentCritical appraisal
Open this folder and view contents6 DEVELOPING SPECIFIC INFORMATION SECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents7 PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLEMENTATION
Open this folder and view contents8 EVALUATION
Open this folder and view contents9 REVIEW AND UPDATE
View the documentREFERENCES
 

Secondary information sources

Secondary sources either review the primary literature or direct a researcher to it, as described below:

1. Reviews are presented as systematic reviews, secondary journal publications (critical appraisal comments added to the abstract of a primary article), clinical practice guidelines, health technology assessments or drug information bulletins. They all review the original evidence and may draw additional conclusions about it. They can be fairly up-to-date, and if the review process has followed a rigorous method such as that used by the Cochrane Collaboration, they can provide quick access to valid, summarized research evidence, including some unpublished “grey literature”.7

2. “Indexing type” bibliographical databases can be used to locate both primary and secondary published literature. The indexing system usually provides bibliographical information indexed by topic and allows the user to view citation details and the abstract of the published manuscript. They are normally searched as electronic databases.

7 The “grey” or unpublished literature can provide useful information because it often shows lack of superiority of newer medicines or other negative findings. Systematic reviews will seek out all scientifically sound studies and include “grey literature” to obtain a comprehensive evaluation.

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